“While his stellar grades didn’t suffer much at first it seemed the longer he was in government school the more his grades reflected the stresses of attending them.”

 

Our twelve-year-old began his education career in a local private Catholic school a few blocks down the street from our home.  With the small classes and caring atmosphere the learning rocketed off the launch pad of kindergarten.  But with money tight and tuition high that adventure only lasted two years.  The transition to public school would begin at the beginning of third grade and last for four long mediocre years.

During the public school debacle he would attend two different elementary schools and one public middle school.  While his stellar grades didn’t suffer much at first it seemed the longer he was in government school the more his grades reflected the stresses of attending them.  From bullying to teachers with anger issues by the time he was in sixth grade he was failing in half of his subjects.  Our only solution to this was to pony up for the last quarter of sixth grade at another private school.  This pulled his mostly failing grades from the gutter and he passed the sixth grade with lower than average performance.  Thank goodness.  But where to from here?

Our answer as of right now is going to be home school.  This adventure literally began last Thursday.  The heavy box of seventh grade curriculum arrived on our porch much to his chagrin.  He was digging this extended summer break.

His teacher is my amazing wife who wants nothing more than for our son to excel in everything he does.  He does for the most part with the exception of math but we think now that he is out of the common core concepts of public school he will do much better.

My area of teaching is going to be shop class.  No education is complete unless you get your hands dirty and learn how to DO things.  How to troubleshoot things.  How to fix things.  Our small wood shop will teach fit and finish and safety.  It will also teach patience.  Our other shop class will be in the garage.  We have a ’65 Mustang to bring back to life.  This 289 powered pony was my wife’s first car and will be his first car.  This project will definitely teach troubleshooting and patience.

Keep in touch for this ongoing adventure.

Thanks for reading.  Be good.  God bless.

 

 

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